Media

Media Hit | Health Care

Dallas Morning News: New law changing health care, costs for many Texans

 

While state GOP leaders rail against it, the federal health insurance law signed by President Barack Obama last year is increasingly changing care and costs for many Texans. Since Jan. 1, as a result of the law, tens of thousands of retirees and disabled people on Medicare have received free preventive care — and partial relief from a “doughnut hole” that’s a big financial hit if they have high drug costs. Last year, nearly a quarter-million Texans received doughnut hole rebates of $250 per person.

 

Media Hit | Transportation

Fort Worth Weekly: Fire Sale

Over the last decade, the debacle of the Trans-Texas Corridor made the phrase “private toll roads” dangerous territory for any Texas politician. The plan to create massive toll-road corridors across the state, with foreign companies in charge and millions of acres of real estate at risk of being taken by eminent domain, drew furious grassroots opposition across the political spectrum. That backlash eventually killed the project — but not exactly with a stake through its heart. One bill now sitting on Gov. Rick Perry’s desk would authorize a slew of new privately operated toll roads across the state. Ironically, the “sunset” legislation was supposed to reform the Texas Department of Transportation, which got in hot water particularly because of the corridor proposal.

Media Hit | Transportation

Dallas Business Journal: Lawmakers seek to alter eminent domain law

The Texas Senate has passed a bill that its authors said will strengthen protections for property owners by closing a loophole in the state’s eminent domain law. That loophole, the bill’s proponents said, has allowed private and government entities to seize property at unfair prices by placing the onus and financial burden on property owners to challenge such taking in court. Critics, however, say the new measure still panders to special interests and is not specific enough.

Media Hit | Transportation

Houston Business Journal: Companies could pay more for land under eminent domain bill

The Texas Senate on Feb. 9 passed a bill its authors said will strengthen protections for property owners by closing a loophole in the state’s eminent domain law. That loophole, the bill’s proponents said, has enabled entities to seize property at unfair prices because the onus and financial burden of legally challenging use of eminent domain falls on property owners. Critics, however, say the measure still panders to special interests and is not specific enough.

Media Hit | Transportation

Austin Business Journal: Eminent domain bill passes Senate; critics doubt its efficacy

Critics of the bill worry its provisions aren’t specific enough to prevent recurrences of past abuse. Proponents said the bill covers most eminent domain situations, but it may not cover all of them, including when the buyback provision might apply. Critics are calling for members in the House Land and Resources Committee to make improvements to the bill.

Pages

Subscribe to More Media

Defend the CFPB

Tell your senators to oppose the “Financial CHOICE Act,” which would gut Wall Street reforms and destroy the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as we know it.

Support Us

Your donation supports TexPIRG's work to stand up for consumers on the issues that matter, especially when powerful interests are blocking progress.

Consumer Alerts

Join our network and stay up to date on our campaigns, get important consumer updates, and take action on critical issues.
Optional Member Code