New resolution could transform Texas transportation

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Aaron Colonnese
Creative Associate

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

What if we could dramatically improve transportation in Texas — and do it with already-existing funding sources?

That's what a new Texas House resolution proposes to do. Introduced on April 20, HJR 109 would create a constitutional amendment enabling Texans to vote to expand what the state's Department of Transportation is allowed to do with gas tax revenues. Currently, those funds can only be used to build more roads — but expanding their targets to include public transit, walking and biking infrastructure, and other transportation options would dramatically reshape the state for cleaner and safer mobility.

“Our current transportation system is wreaking havoc on our health and the health of our planet,” said TexPIRG State Director Bay Scoggin. “Decades of car-centered investment strategies have left us with inefficient and dangerous transportation infrastructure — and this resolution is exactly the forward-thinking strategy we need to give Texans more and better options to get around.”

Read more.

Learn more about our campaigns to transform transportation in Texas.

GET INVOLVED
Tell your legislators to stand up to wasteful highway expansion plans

We need to stop wasting money on highway "boondoggles," which research shows tend to exacerbate traffic congestion rather than alleviate it. Call on your legislators to shelve plans for these wasteful projects and instead invest in providing more transportation options and maintaining the roads we have.

Photo: What if, instead of using gas tax revenues to to build more roads and fuel more traffic and more air pollition, we used them to invest in a more sustainable transportation future? Credit: Aaron Kohr via Shutterstock

Aaron Colonnese
Creative Associate

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.