21st Century Transportation

Efficient public transportation like intercity rail and clean bus systems make our transportation system better for everyone by reducing traffic congestion and pollution, and increasing our options for getting around.

Reforming our broken transportation system

Changing Transportation: TexPIRG's series of reports on the dramatic changes underway in how Americans want to get around.

In the 20th century, Americans fell in love with the car. Driving a car became a rite of passage. Owning a car became a symbol of American freedom and mobility. And so we invested in a network of interstate highways that facilitated travel and connected the nation.

Now we're in a new century, with new challenges and new transportation needs. We still love our cars, but we also know they harm the environment around us. Americans want choices for getting to work, school, shopping and more. As lifestyles change, Americans — especially the Millennial generation — are changing their driving and transportation preferences.

We need a transportation system that reflects this century.

Consider:

Public transportation ridership nationwide is hitting record highs. This trend is greatest among younger Americans — who will be the biggest users of the infrastructure we build today. Since the 1950s — despite knowing that buses and rail use far less energy and space — we have spent nine times more on highway projects than on public transportation.

In 2015, more than half of Americans — and nearly two-thirds of Millennials, the country’s largest generation — want to live “in a place where they do not need to use a car very often.” Similar trends exist for older adults. Older adults in general put the creation of pedestrian-friendly streets and local investment in public transportation in their top five priorities for their communities.

By reducing traffic and pollution, and increasing our options for getting around, efficient public transportation systems like intercity rail and clean bus systems would make America’s transportation future better for everyone.

But America also needs to repair and maintain its current aging infrastructure. Nearly 59,000 of the nation’s bridges are classified as “structurally deficient.” Instead of building newer and wider highways that will only make America more dependent on dirty fossil fuels, we need to be smart in how we invest in roads, and fix them first.

The good news is that the public is in many ways ahead of Congress in leading the way toward reform. Help us make sure our decision makers recognize the need to invest in a 21st century transportation system.

Check out our video showcasing our work to bring about better transportation options for America's future.

Issue updates

Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Millennials in Motion

Millennials are less car-focused than older Americans and previous generations of young people, and their transportation behaviors continue to change in ways that reduce driving. Now is the time for the nation’s transportation policies to acknowledge, accommodate and support Millennials’ demands for a greater array of transportation choices.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Highway Boondoggles

Even though the Driving Boom is now over, state and federal governments continue to pour vast sums of money into the construction of new highways and expansion of old ones – at the expense of urgent needs such as road and bridge repairs, improvements in public transportation and other transportation priorities. Eleven proposed highway projects across the country – slated to cost at least $13 billion – exemplify the need for a fresh approach to transportation spending.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Course

Universities and colleges across the country are taking steps to encourage their communities, students, faculty and staff to decrease their reliance on personal vehicles. These efforts are working well – saving money for universities, improving the quality of life in college towns, and giving today’s students experience in living life without depending on a personal car.

> Keep Reading
News Release | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Report Shows Texas cities Driving Less, Using Transit and Alternatives More

A first-of-its-kind report by TexPIRG Education Fund shows reduced driving miles and rates of car commuting in Texas’s urbanized areas—including Austin, San Antonio and Houston—and greater use of public transit and biking.

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

TRANSPORTATION IN TRANSITION

Americans’ transportation habits have changed. The average American drives 7.6 percent fewer miles today than when per-capita driving peaked in 2004.
 

> Keep Reading

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News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Victory for landowners, property rights and all Texans

A broad coalition of organizations and landowners from across Texas and the United States are hailing members of the House Land and Resource Management Committee for protecting the property rights of Texans.

> Keep Reading
News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Eminent Domain “Reform” Bill Does Not Protect Landowners

A broad coalition of organizations and landowners from across Texas are urging lawmakers to reject a bill some legislators are claiming will increase protections for property owners. Governor Rick Perry declared eminent domain reform an emergency in his state of the state address earlier this month and shortly after, Senators quickly rushed through SB 18 without time for public input. Without significant changes to the Senate-passed law, landowners will continue to be vulnerable to future eminent domain abuses and profit-driven land grabs for economic development.

> Keep Reading
News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Legislature’s Smoke and Mirrors Charade with Gas Tax Identified

According to an analysis by Texas Public Interest Research Group (TexPIRG) of the Legislative Budget Board’s Recommendations to the House Appropriations Committee, Texas is set to direct more than $2 billon in dedicated transportation funds from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) to 13 other state agencies.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Austin Business Journal: Eminent domain bill passes Senate; critics doubt its efficacy

Critics of the bill worry its provisions aren’t specific enough to prevent recurrences of past abuse. Proponents said the bill covers most eminent domain situations, but it may not cover all of them, including when the buyback provision might apply. Critics are calling for members in the House Land and Resources Committee to make improvements to the bill.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Houston Business Journal: Companies could pay more for land under eminent domain bill

The Texas Senate on Feb. 9 passed a bill its authors said will strengthen protections for property owners by closing a loophole in the state’s eminent domain law. That loophole, the bill’s proponents said, has enabled entities to seize property at unfair prices because the onus and financial burden of legally challenging use of eminent domain falls on property owners. Critics, however, say the measure still panders to special interests and is not specific enough.

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