Stop the Dallas Trinity Parkway Boondoggle

More and more of us are moving off the roads. Yet, across the country there are countless proposed highway projects, like the Dallas Trinity Parkway, that are not just expensive — they’re outright boondoggles. We need your help to stop it. 

It's time to shift Texas’ transportation priorities

These days, more and more of us are moving off the roads. Across the country, and here in Texas, people are driving less on average than we have in years past. Driving peaked in America in 2007. Since then, the Millennial Generation has led the way, with more people walking, biking and taking transit. In fact, in 2014 more people rode public transportation than had in 57 years! Meanwhile, new technologies and other options, such as bike sharing, are making it easier for people to rely less on cars.

Yet, despite these well-documented changes in transportation trends, our decision makers continue to prioritize new roads and wasteful highway expansions. Meanwhile, other needs — from expanding public transportation to critical bridge repairs — go unmet. At a time when one in nine bridges in America are considered “structurally deficient,” these confused priorities put millions of Americans in danger every single day. 

The Dallas Trinity Parkway Boondoggle

In Texas, as part of a massive highway expansion plan for the Dallas-Fort Worth area to combat congestion, the state has proposed building a nine-mile, six-lane urban tollway that would run along the Trinity River through the heart of Dallas. Known as the Trinity Parkway, this 1.5 billion dollar megaproject has a budget gap of nearly $1 billion, and up to 80% of the cost of construction still remains unaccounted for. While partnering with private investors is on the table and taxpayers could be responsible for some of the difference, it is ultimately unclear where the money will come from. At a time when there are already 23 structurally deficient bridges in Dallas County alone, this is simply unacceptable. 

The timing of this proposal is critical as Dallas is currently experiencing major urban revitalization. This downtown renewal has been largely boosted by the expansion of public transportation in the area, which supports a growing residential base, and greatly appeals to highly sought-after millennial workers, who prefer a more urban live-work-play environment. 

Despite dissent from residents, continued risk of flooding, lack of proof that the tollway will decrease congestion, hindered urban revitalization, destruction of both riverfront access and thousands of acres of parkland, and increasing opposition from Dallas leaders, city officials, including Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, continue to push to develop the parkway. We need your help. Tell the governor to kill this wasteful and expensive project. We do not want irresponsible spending on unnecessary highway expansion at the expense of our community, our environment, and our development. 

Moving Texas forward 

Our lives, our communities, and how we get around are constantly changing. It’s well past time for our transportation spending priorities to reflect these changes, rather than the outdated assumptions that so many of them are based upon. We deserve to have a safe, reliable transportation system that offers real options for however people might want to get around. Stopping this highway boondoggle is an important first step for getting us there.

Issue updates

News Release | U.S. PIRG

New COVID-19 testing chief should implement plan to ramp up testing in next 7 days

U.S. PIRG is calling on the Assistant Secretary for Health Adm. Brett Giroir, the recently appointed head of the Trump administration’s COVID-19 testing response, to immediately adopt the plan put forward by former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner David Kessler, MD. The plan would help ensure that testing capacity is ramped up over the next seven days--a crucial window in which we may be able to limit the severity of the outbreak--so that anyone who needs a test will get a test.

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News Release | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Tips

Coronavirus worry triggers most surgical mask, sanitizer prices to spike at least 50% on Amazon

AUSTIN-- Amazon may monitor its marketplace for price gouging, but a new analysis by U.S. PIRG Education Fund has revealed that these checks don’t always succeed in preventing significant price hikes. With so many people worried about Coronavirus, the consumer advocacy organization looked at the prices for two types of increasingly popular products: hand sanitizers and surgical masks.  

Researchers compared the average price for those items over three months to the high price on Amazon since the World Health Organization declared a global health emergency on January 30. As the outbreak became more widespread, the price of most of the sanitizers and masks rose at least 50 percent higher than the 90-day average. Even one in six products sold directly by Amazon -- not third-party vendors using the online marketplace -- saw prices rise at least 50 percent higher in February, as Americans became more aware of the Coronavirus.

> Keep Reading
News Release | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Tips

Coronavirus worry triggers most surgical mask, sanitizer prices to spike at least 50% on Amazon

AUSTIN-- Amazon may monitor its marketplace for price gouging, but a new analysis by U.S. PIRG Education Fund has revealed that these checks don’t always succeed in preventing significant price hikes. With so many people worried about Coronavirus, the consumer advocacy organization looked at the prices for two types of increasingly popular products: hand sanitizers and surgical masks.  

Researchers compared the average price for those items over three months to the high price on Amazon since the World Health Organization declared a global health emergency on January 30. As the outbreak became more widespread, the price of most of the sanitizers and masks rose at least 50 percent higher than the 90-day average. Even one in six products sold directly by Amazon -- not third-party vendors using the online marketplace -- saw prices rise at least 50 percent higher in February, as Americans became more aware of the Coronavirus.

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Coronavirus worry triggers most surgical mask, sanitizer prices to spike at least 50% on Amazon

As the Coronvirus outbreak became more widespread, the price of most of the sanitizers and masks rose at least 50 percent higher than the 90-day average. Even one in six products sold directly by Amazon saw prices rise at least 50 percent higher in February

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Financial Reform

CFPB's First Director, Rich Cordray, Publishes "Watchdog" | Ed Mierzwinski

The CFPB's first director, Rich Cordray, has published a book, "Watchdog," explaining efforts to set up and run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

Statement: Proposal to take flavored vaping products off market a crucial tactic to stop youth epidemic

In response to growing concerns about the health threats of vaping and its skyrocketing use among youth, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced today that the Food and Drug Administration is preparing to finalize guidance to prohibit the sale of all flavored e-cigarette products other than tobacco flavored.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

U.S. PIRG applauds Michigan for banning flavored e-cigarettes, urges other states to act

Michigan today became the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

U.S. PIRG commends FDA on its proposed graphic warnings for cigarettes, urges increased action on e-cigarettes as a major health threat

The Food and Drug Administration proposed a rule today that would require new warnings for cigarette packages that depict the health risks of smoking. 

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News Release | TexPIRG | Consumer Protection

1 in 10 surveyed daycares still using deadly, recalled infant sleepers

Three months after nearly 5.4 million infant sleepers were recalled for causing 36 infant deaths, a new survey by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education (U.S. PIRG) and Kids in Danger (KID) revealed that many child care facilities continue to use these dangerous inclined sleepers. The survey began after PIRG Consumer Watchdog Adam Garber discovered that his own son’s daycare in Philadelphia was using the recalled products.

“Every day, millions of parents drop their kids off, assuming their daycares have the information they need to keep their kids safe,” said Garber. “This failed recall is a wakeup call that our current system leaves too many infants at risk from these dangerous sleepers.”

U.S. PIRG and KID blamed the situation on confusing messages about the recall. Initially, a consumer warning for the Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play on April 4th linked deaths to infant rollovers, leading some parents and facilities to conclude that proper use would keep babies safe. But a more complete analysis revealed some deaths occurred when the child was buckled in, leading the company and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to fully recall the 4.7 million Rock ‘n Play sleepers soon after on April 14. On April 26, nearly 700,000 units of the Kids II Rocking Sleeper were recalled.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Houston’s $7 billion solution to gridlock is more highways

Like many American cities, Houston is encircled by rings of highways—nine major radial freeways, three ring freeways, and a 180-mile fourth outer ring on the way.

But Houston isn’t just encircled by roads, it’s symbolically, and literally, being choked by cars. It’s consistently ranked as a top city for traffic congestion, ninth-worst for ozone pollution according to the American Lung Association, and a tragic nexus for deaths from car crashes. The annual death toll, according to the Houston Chronicle, is equivalent to “three fully-loaded 737s crashing each year at Houston’s airports, killing all aboard.”

According to the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), the solution is more roads, specifically, a multiyear, multibillion dollar project to widen and expand the city’s highway infrastructure in an attempt to ease persistent bottlenecks that clog downtown traffic.

 

This isn’t a small upgrade: in the name of accelerating commutes, the North Houston Highway Improvement Project (NHHIP) will widen and rebuild nearly 25 miles of highways in the city’s downtown, expanding some to be as wide as the length of two football fields. In addition to years of construction, the “Texas-sized” expansion would displace four houses of worship, two schools, 168 homes, 1,067 multifamily units, and 331 businesses that account for just under 25,000 employees, impacting mostly people of color in low-income neighborhoods.

It would add more impermeable concrete and asphalt infrastructure, plus future maintenance costs, to a city that is still recovering from some of the worst floods in recent memory. Resilience is a serious concern post-Harvey, and as flood maps are updated as flood risks evolve, the addition of concrete to the landscape could make the next storm’s impact worse. Houstonians still recall how highways became channels of water that cut off neighborhoods from aid during the worst of the flooding.

To critics, the I-45 project, named after the main highway that will be impacted, is an urban renewal reboot, a modern version of the freeway expansion projects that wrecked neighborhoods and divided cities in the ‘50s and ‘60s. Why would more urban highways and lanes of traffic—especially at a time when many cities are actively removing or capping their highways—be a foregone conclusion in any effort to mitigate Houston’s serious congestion problem?

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Higher Ed

Nuevo Informe Identifica los Prestamistas Privados Más Problemáticos para los Estudiantes

Los Estudiantes de el estado de Texas Resuelven Conflictos de Préstamos a Través de la Base de Datos del Consumidor de la CFPB

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Higher Ed

Private Loans, Public Complaints

The CFPB’s Consumer Complaint Database Gets Real Results for Student Borrowers

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Way to Go

America is in the midst of a technological revolution … and a big shift in our transportation habits.

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Big Banks, Big Complaints

This report is the first of several that will review complaints to the CFPB nationally and on a state-by-state basis. In this report we explore consumer complaints about bank accounts and services with the aim of uncovering patterns in the problems consumers are experiencing with their banks.

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Moving Off the Road

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Pages

Blog Post

U.S. PIRG endorses bipartisan bill to end hunger on college campuses

A bipartisan consensus is forming around at least one issue: battling hunger among college students.

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Blog Post

Right to Repair campaign pushes Apple to make some initial changes

Apple is starting to get the message: Growing numbers of consumers are done putting up with stuff they can't repair.

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Blog Post

PIRG calls for improvements in food recall system after CDC reports yet another E. coli outbreak

Here we go again: In April, another illness outbreak was tied to contaminated food, this time sickening over 170 people in Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, Ohio, Tennessee and Virginia.

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Blog Post

After U.S. PIRG Education Fund report, Wells Fargo eliminates some student debit card fees

After TexPIRG reported on problems in its debit card practices, Wells Fargo took steps to eliminate some "surprise" fees on student cards.

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Blog Post

We're calling on Wendy's to 'Hold the Antibiotics' from its beef supply chain

How can the country's third-largest burger chain help save the cornerstone of modern medicine? By buying only beef raised without the routine use of antibiotics.

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Pages

Blog Post

U.S. PIRG is calling on municipal, state and federal policymakers to mandate face masks in all indoor public spaces, as well as in outdoor locations where it’s hard for people to socially distance six feet apart.

Report

Our report on how manufacturers restrict repair for devices in hospitals, and how that impacts patient care. The report includes a survey of 222 medical device repair professionals, which highlights how widespread these issues are in hospitals, even during the pandemic. 

News Release | TexPIRG

With the number of COVID-19 cases continuing to rise nationally, TexPIRG released a new fact sheet today, showing Texas is “trending poorly” when it comes to meeting COVID-19 containment criteria. This is the second week TexPIRG has tracked in-state coronavirus efforts. Last week, Texas received a “trending poorly” grade. 

News Release | TexPIRG

Today, Gov. Greg Abbott issued a mask mandate for Texans living in counties with 20 or more positive COVID-19 cases. Lauren Banister, TexPIRG Public Interest Associate, issued the following statement in response to this decision.

News Release | TexPIRG

The U.S Department of Health and Human Services  has reversed its decision to end federal funding for five of the seven testing sites it had slated for closure in Texas. Last week, the Trump Administration released plans to end federal funding for 13 coronavirus testing sites on June 30 with seven of those testing sites in major Texas cities. Five of the sites in Texas now have a two week extension of federal funding.

Lauren Banister, TexPIRG Associate issued the following statement in response to this decision

Transportation

Austin approves big expansion in clean, electric public transit

The Austin City Council and Capital Metro board of directors have unanimously approved the TexPIRG-backed Project Connect System Plan, which would dramatically expand the city's light rail transit system, its fleet of zero-emission electric buses and the routes those buses take.

 

Public Health

Responding to the COVID crisis

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, now more than ever, we need to work together to ensure that our government has a coordinated, strategic response to safeguard the public’s health, protect consumers from emerging dangers and ensure people can still participate fully in our democracy.

 

Transportation

House transportation bill prioritizes fixing infrastructure, sustainable investment

Federal lawmakers have put forward the INVEST in America Act — a nearly $500 billion transportation spending bill which prioritizes repairing existing infrastructure over new highway projects, and contains key provisions for more sustainable investments.

 

Solid Waste

U.S. PIRG, coalition partners urge Congress to reject plastics industry investment proposal

In a letter, U.S. PIRG, the Break Free From Plastic movement and a coalition of NGOs called on Congress to reject a plastics industry proposal to invest up to $1 billion in industry infrastructure and expressed strong support for federal legislation to slash plastic waste.

 
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