Transportation

Media Hit | Transportation

Dallas Morning News: Texas lawmakers to weigh private road deals against tax increases

 Two years ago, lawmakers went to war with Gov. Rick Perry over his push to privatize Texas toll roads, but their efforts to stop the idea largely failed. As they return Tuesday to launch the 2009 legislative session, lawmakers will be faced with a choice of either raising taxes – which both Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst have called a bad idea – or giving private companies a greater role in paying for, and operating, a fast-expanding network of toll roads.The two-year moratorium on private road deals that passed in 2007 slowed but didn't kill Perry's plan to privatize toll roads. Construction on one project is set to begin soon in Austin, and private firms are readying bids in Dallas, Tarrant and other counties across Texas.

 

Report | TexPIRG | Transportation

Economic Stimulus or Simply More Misguided Spending?

President-elect Obama has declared that the next recovery plan must do more than just pump money into the economy. It will also create the infrastructure that America needs for the 21st century. This fall, Congress asked states to submit lists of “ready-to-go” transportation infrastructure projects that could be funded by the stimulus package. Lists from nineteen state departments of transportation (DOTs) show that the broader goals articulated by President-elect Obama will be undermined if Congress, the Administration, and the states do not establish forward-looking rules for spending stimulus funds.

News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

New Study: Red Flags in Texas’ Transportation Stimulus Wish List

A new study of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) wish list, recently submitted to Congress for funding under a new economic recovery package, suggests that Texas’ current project list would undermine efforts to repair and modernize our deteriorating infrastructure and reduce U.S. dependence on oil.

News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Report: Texas Transit Reducing Traffic, Oil Use and Pollution

A new report by TexPIRG finds that transit systems in Austin, Houston and DFW eliminated the need for more than 44 million gallons of oil in 2006, saving consumers more $116 million in saved gasoline costs and avoiding emissions of 270,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas. Austin transit also prevented what would have otherwise been an additional 1.7 million hours in traffic delays for drivers.

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